How to Quit Drinking Coffee

I love coffee. I have a cup (or two!) every morning. For a long time I never drank the stuff, I just didn’t develop a taste for it. Once I graduated from college and started working at Microsoft, that changed. I started drinking coffee just to pass the time or while taking a break with co-workers. I was also living in Seattle….the coffee capital of the universe. Eventually I grew to love the stuff.

Over the years I’ve had an on again off again relationship with coffee. I’ve even blogged about my swapping out a coffee habit for a tea habit. At times I drank too much of it, and felt like it was an addiction I didn’t need in my life. I would feel a little jittery and at times have trouble sleeping. Tea, even the caffeinated varieties, never gave me the same trouble.

Right now I am thoroughly enjoying my coffee habit and have no desire to quit. I have 1-2 big cups in the morning (I brew it myself) and feel no ill effects. In fact I’m drinking some right now! Perhaps my body has developed some kind of tolerance, or perhaps I’m just blind to the continuing ill affects. Even more likely, my days are no longer stuck behind a desk. I’m very active and that makes a big difference in how well my body processes food and drink – caffeinated beverages included.

Whatever the reason I’m still sticking to my coffee habit. There are more important things for me to focus on right now.

However, my wife is taking a break from drinking coffee, it just isn’t sitting well with her right now. She is a true coffee aficionado though, which makes her giving up the stuff even harder. She has shown a ton of willpower in being coffee free for a few weeks now and we talk quite a bit about it.

Since coffee is on my mind (and in my mouth) right now, I thought I would share five tips for those looking to quit, based on my own experience in the past.

Get clear on why you want to stop drinking coffee

We are motivated by compelling reasons more than anything else. Why do you want to stop drinking coffee? Is this the right time to do so? How will your life be better without it? Is it really a priority?

The urge to give things up in the hope that it will make life remarkably better can be a big one….but without first getting clear on why taking action is important the deeper intrinsic motivation will be lacking. Take some time to ponder your compelling reason “Why?”.

Commit to going cold turkey off coffee

Many articles on the internet mention that going cold-turkey isn’t the smartest thing. These articles point to the numerous withdrawal symptoms that come with caffeine withdrawal. That’s why I go cold-turkey off coffee, but continue drinking other caffeinated drinks for a while.

Going cold-turkey has been the only method that has worked for me. Just tapering back on the amount of coffee consumed over time never worked. It was too tempting to drink more. YMMV.

Wean off the caffeine over time

To avoid withdrawal symptoms, I would start drinking green tea or Yerbe Mate instead of coffee. There is a good amount of caffeine in these drinks, but in my experience they don’t lead to the jittery-ness or highs and lows that caffeine in coffee provides. I could drink a big cup of Yerbe Mate in the afternoon and sleep like a baby. The same was never true with coffee. Again YMMV.

Over time, if you want to cut back on all caffeine, you can explore the world of herbal teas or coffee substitutes (based on chicory, carob and other caffeine free and healthy ingredients). My wife is drinking is drinking this stuff right now, I tried it and it’s decent:

TeeccinoFrench Roast Herbal Coffee Alternative, Caffeine and Acid Free, 10 count (Pack of 6)

Develop a new morning/afternoon drink ritual.

A lot of the desire to drink coffee can be linked to the ritual associated with it. Maybe you enjoy drinking a steaming cup with your partner in the morning. Maybe its a way to relax with co-workers in the afternoon. Maybe you like walking to Starbucks during your lunch break and getting some fresh air.

Replicate those rituals, but find a substitute for the coffee. Walk to a juice bar instead of a coffee shop. Get loose leaf teas and proper tea brewing equipment to make the process more fun. Propose going on a walk with co-workers instead of sitting at the coffee bar. Etc.

Keep a log/journal for 10 days (minimum)

This one is important, particularly if you are wanting to quit coffee for a health-related reason. Make note of what you eat/drink, your sleep quality and energy levels (and whatever other health indicators you are monitoring). See how your coffee free-ness is helping (or not) your cause over time.

There might be something else you can do to more dramatically improve your well-being than just giving up coffee, or perhaps coffee is really throwing a monkey wrench into your quality of living. The only way to know if to objectively look at the data. Keep a log for at least 10 days. Review it and see for yourself. If it’s working keeping it up. If not, change your approach.

 

Minimalist Living vs. Your Stuff

I have a weird fascination with minimalist living.

I don’t want to be a minimalist, but I do want to keep my life simplified to the point where I’m not spending hours every month trying to find stuff I already that’s buried in the bowels of a storage room somewhere.

A friend of mine had a trick to keep his belongings pared down to just the essentials. Whenever he got something, like a book for example, he got rid of something.

This was a practical solution for him since he was a long-term traveler and carried all his belongings in a backpack. There was literally no room or strength left to lug extra stuff around. To my knowledge he continued to hold this philosophy even after settling down again.

With the holidays coming up, chances are that whether you want to or not you will end up getting more stuff. Either you will succumb to the slew of limited-time-only deals or you will have presents to deal with.

Go ahead and enjoy the new stuff, but consider getting rid of an equal quantity of things to make room for it. Re-gift, donate or sell. Keeping stuff around has a cost, even if it came to you for free.

Warren Buffett – How to Identify a Good Investment

Words of wisdom from the Oracle of Omaha, Warren Buffet.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14SK4CX_KYY&w=640&h=480]

 

Highlights

  • Habits and character matter a lot…pay attention to how things are done not just what gets done.
  • People who function well are not the ones with the “biggest motors” they are the ones with the “most efficient motors.”
  • Story of founder of Nebraska Furniture Mart still working at age 101, and sharp as a tack 
  • If you can buy a business with a founder who has strong character and solid work ethic and smarts you can’t go wrong. 
  • Any good investment idea can be put in one paragraph.
  • “Buy a business that is so good that any idiot can run it, because sooner or later one will!” Warren Buffet quoting Peter Lynch.
  • Circle of confidence. You need to know what you know vs don’t know and be clear on where the edges are. 
  • When I find a good business I buy a lot of it and hold it for a long time, since there aren’t many of them out there.
  • The time to sell a really great business is NEVER. 
  • I like business where I think I know what it will look like in 20 years.

 

Unarmed Self-Defense Training

Last weekend I attended an Unarmed Self Defense workshop, conducted by Insights Training. The last time I hit anyone was in tae kwon do class when I was 10 years old. I figured it would be a good idea to learn how to hit and defend myself at a basic level. I also heard great things about the training and figured it would be a good use of a weekend. I was right.

The workshop was two full days and was mostly drill-focused with partners. Hardly any time was spent sitting in chairs. We would learn a technique for defending/attacking and then carry it out multiple times with multiple opponents. We covered a variety of grabs and attacks – both standing and on the ground. We also learned how to de-escalate verbally and through body language. The culmination of the day was a full force attack against a trainer in a specially designed attack suit. During breaks the trainer would tell stories and answer questions to teach new material.

The most important learning  for me was a new mindset (one of preparedness and a desire to protect what matters most) and a firm understanding of my rights to protect what is important to me. Mindset is even more critical than fitness, equipment or skill. Personal safety is not something I have spent much time thinking about so this weekend definitely opened my mind to a whole new world and how to deal with it effectively. If you are in the Seattle area I highly recommend taking this training.

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Me telling my attacker who is boss!

 

Nothing to Do and That’s OK With Me

I’m finishing up the first month of my sabbatical and I’ve intentionally not set any big goals or projects in front of me. The last thing I want to do is treat this break from work like I treat my work! So for the past month I’ve mostly chilled out.

I did spend 10 days on Kauai, but even that was very spontaneous and every day just unfolded as it needed to. Not much in the way of planning went into that trip. I had a permit for a few nights of camping and figured out the rest as the days rolled by.
Fast forward a month, and this morning my brain was sorta freaking out, feeling like it didn’t have a focus, I was rudderless and life was passing me by. I just went back to bed and that fixed things up really quickly! Amazing what a cure sleep can be.
Nowadays I’m quite content doing yard work, riding my bike around town fetching groceries, cleaning the house, reading (a lot) and going for the occasional run or hike. I’ve also starting learning more about how to properly use the fancy digital camera I bought last year. I now know that the “intelligent auto” setting is decent but far from suitable for many shots I aspire to take.
I’ve been surprised how my mind/body has been anxious at the prospect of not having a big project on the horizon, meetings to attend or a big to-do list, but I suppose that is the experience I needed to have this past month and I’ve learned to accept that.

Early Retirement Extreme by Jacob Lund Fisker

Early Retirement Extreme: A Philosophical and Practical Guide to Financial IndependenceEarly Retirement Extreme: A Philosophical and Practical Guide to Financial Independence by Jacob Lund Fisker

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
This is book is not like any of the other “retire early in 10 easy steps” books…it is a full-blown life plan for making it happen, and not for those who aren’t willing or able to take massive action to change their current consumerist habits.

I’ve read a ton of blogs and books on financial management and investment, but this one has a very counter-intuitive and yes – EXTREME – approach to retirement that can be achieved relatively quickly. The overall thesis is that by saving a majority of one’s net income (50, 60, 70 or even 80%!) on an annual basis, it is possible to “retire” in five years or so. This is the case not just due to the high amount of savings, but the low annual expenses needed to sustain a lifestyle where you live on 20% of what is earned. The author was a theoretical physicist and the attention to detail comes through (and at times the math equations get a bit extreme!).

What I liked:
1. A significant amount of the book is devoted to the MINDSET needed (philosophy /psychology) around the early retirement approach. It really goes deep and Jacob provides examples (from his own life), frameworks to help the reader understand character types and plenty of hardcore data.
2. There are specific strategies and tactics that can be applied on day 1 by the reader to boost savings and cut expenses. Some may not apply to you, but many will.
3. There is a very detailed blog Early Retirement Extreme that provides more examples, Q&A topics and links to an active online forum to go deeper into various topics.

What I didn’t like:
1. Many times the books dives too deep into a topic (e.g. in taking about character archetypes, detailing math equations) or seem to be going off on tangents and rambling. I am good at skimming/skipping this stuff so didn’t mind it too much. Overall, there is much more good about this book to love so I was willing to put up with these parts.

View all my reviews

Yoga Strengthens Your Weakest Links

I recently started practicing yoga asana again after a 9 month hiatus. Life got busy so I spent my time doing things aside from heading to a warm yoga studio to sweat and breath deeply. Over the past few weeks I’ve rolled out my mat several times. I’ve re-discovered how my yoga practice illuminates and challenges my “weakest links.” Right now these weak links are my ability to breath deeply, flex my spine and maintain a steadiness of mind. What I love is that even though I’m challenged now, I know that what is challenged will inevitably react and strengthen.

 

The Fear of Enlightenment – Alan Watts

  • Each of us are really the Great Self
  • We deny this because we don’t “feel it”
  • We are frightened of feeling it
  • We develop a method of practice of putting off feeling it
  • We think we need to suffer and be worthy of being our Great Self
  • All of this is just postponement, because we are  afraid to see it in the here and now
  • Suffering is something we (falsely) think we need to do to achieve enlightenment
  • Suffering has nothing to do with realization of the Self
  • Realization of the Self is just about “coming off it” (it being our own perceived model of the world)
  • A guru/teacher is always saying to you “what are you doing? what is your game?”
  • A guru/teacher has many methods of helping you see the reality of who you are
  • If you have a thin shell, it can be easy for a guru/teacher to help you
  • If you have a thick shell, it can be tougher

We Control The Meaning of Our Lives

Last month I participated in my second Date With Destiny experience. This is a program led by Tony Robbins that focuses on identifying the core values driving you today, the new values you want to live by and using this new “inner compass” to direct your life in an even more fulfilling manner. There was a lot to take in over the six days, but one distinction that I came away with is that we control the meaning of our lives (past, present and future).

No matter what.

No matter what has happened in the past, no matter what troubling conditions we are dealing with in the present, and no matter how potentially bleak the future looks; we can create our own meanings from the experience and either use it to empower ourselves or cast ourselves as a victim.

In the same way that one person could love a day full of bright sunshine and another could cower with fear of getting sunburn, so it is that we can define how we react to situations, memories and possibilities in a way that serves us or in a way that doesn’t.

Homeless Billionaire Nicolas Berggruen Prefers the Simple Life

Ran across a refreshing story today about Nicolas Berggruen, a billionaire who sold off his homes, car and many possessions years ago and lives a simpler life than most people with a fraction of his net worth. Granted, it does appear that he isn’t slumming it by any means, preferring to live in 5 star hotels instead of his own homes, but his comments are insightful:

“Everybody is different and I think that we live in a material world. But for  me, possessing things is not that interesting. Living in a grand environment to  show myself and others that I have wealth has zero appeal. Whatever I own is  temporary, since we’re only here for a short period of time. It’s what we do and  produce, it’s our actions, that will last forever. That’s real value.”

On why he doesn’t get that much enjoyment from owning things:

“First, I don’t need it. Secondly, maybe in a bizarre kind of way, I don’t want  to be dependent on it or have the responsibility. I don’t get that much  enjoyment out of saying ‘I own it.’ “

The New Good Life by John Robbins: Book Review

I’ve ready several of John Robbin’s previous books, including Diet for a New America and Healthy at 100. Both were awesome, and his latest book, The New Good Life, is no exception. Robbin’s story is remarkable not just because he eschewed a life of privilege at a young age (he was the heir to the Baskin-Robbins fortune and destined to take over the business, but gave it up to live off the land in a log cabin for 10 years) but because his message is so clear, supported by facts yet engaging to read.

The book states that “The New Good Life” can be had by anyone who is willing to focus on what brings joy in life and not what prevailing market trends and peers dictate as necessary parts of a successful life. Do we need multiple fancy cars? Do we need large expensive houses? Do we need to work long hours in jobs that don’t bring fulfillment? Do we need to spend money we don’t have on food that is destroying our health and the environment? Those are all trappings of the “old good life” and no longer sustainable for the exploding modern world population.

What I like about this book is that it is NOT a book about minimalism. I personally do not believe a minimal lifestyle is inherently better than a highly consumptive one. There are many positive benefits, however, of being happy with less, when the motivation in doing so is appropriate. That is exactly the message in this book. Explore the possibility that you might be happy with less. Challenge yourself to really focus on the things that bring you happy and your family joy, and do more of those things and less of the rest.

I read this book in a single weekend…..it’s that good – though I did skip the chapter on health as it repeats similar messages as covered in his previous books.

Finding Ultra by Rich Roll: Book Review

My last two books were both written by vegan endurance athletes. Eat & Run by Scott Jurek and more recently Finding Ultra by Rich Roll. Both were enjoyable reads and inspiring. What I like about Finding Ultra is the focus on multi-sport athletics (triathlon). Rich also has a very unique background; having been a standout student, lawyer and national-level competitive swimmer…all the while battling alcoholism.

If you like Eat & Run, you will definitely enjoy Finding Ultra. However, I did think Eat & Run was a better book overall. It interleaved more plant-based nutritional guidance throughout the book. Finding Ultra, while it did have nutritional advice, seemed to be pitching supplementation using products from a company Rich Roll is involved with. Eat & Run focused on recipes you can cook at home – I like that. I also just think Eat & Run was better written and overall more inspiring a story (Scott Jurek has done some pretty gnarly races and has a much longer endurance race history!).

So do read both books if you can. If you need to pick one, go with Eat & Run.

Eat & Run by Scott Jurek

Read Scott Jurek‘s book Eat & Run last week. It is an awesome read, and it doesn’t matter if you are vegan or into running long distances.

I thought I knew Scott’s story, but there is a lot in this book that was totally new to me. He had a tough upbringing and surprising stories about his races. For example, I knew he raced the Hardrock 100, but I had no idea he did it on a nearly broken ankle! I also knew he raced (and won) the Spartathlon, a 150 mile race in Greece, but I didn’t he won it twice!

The book also introduces a few dozen vegan recipes….that are quite good. I made his recipe for mushroom-lentil veggie burgers and they turned out amazingly well. Nice to read a story about someone who is performing at a world-class athletic level on a plant-based diet.

The Pilgrimage by Paulo Coelho

I just finished reading The Pilgrimage, A Contemporary Quest for Ancient Wisdom, by Paulo Coelho. The novel follows Paulo as he goes on pilgrimage across Spain in search of a miraculous sword. It’s a story of  a man in search of spiritual development and mastery. The pilgrim’s path is a sacred one used by millions of pilgrims in the Christian faith, one that leads from the mountains near France to the coast of Spain. The path is also known as “The Way of St. James.”

Along the way, he is guided by a wise man, and learns a number of important lessons. I particularly like how the book introduces a number of interesting meditations (8-10, can’t remember exactly) that you can apply in your own life. It’s both a story and a personal development manual.

While this book is not nearly as profound as The Alchemist (perhaps my favorite book of all-time, also by Coelho) it is a worthwhile and fast read. I got through it in a long weekend of lazy reading.

Three Simple Meditation Tips

Meditation is something that anyone can do. It doesn’t require any type of special certification or training in a certain meditation technique. It just requires consistent practice. Here are three helpful tips to help you in your own meditation practice:

  1. Sit every day, no matter how long or short. Frequency matters more than length. Like any habit, doing it often and with regularity – even if you can only sit for 60 seconds a day – is better than a multi-hour marathon meditation session once a week.

  2. Sit in a dark and quiet place. Less distractions the better, especially if your mind wanders easily. When in a small apartment that was brightly lit, even in the morning, I would cover my entire head with a shawl.

  3. Sit early morning. Before your coffee. Before getting dressed. Make your meditation the first thing you do.

 

How will you measure your life? Another post.

I just finished reading Clayton Christensen’s new book, How Will You Measure Your Life. As i posted before, when I joined Microsoft as an intern over 12 years ago my manager handed me a copy of his then breakthrough best-seller “The Innovators Dilemma” (it’s still a best seller). I liked it for the way it used historical examples and simple theory to explain complex business situations.

What I like about his most recent book, is that it provides more of these theories, but applies them to personal life situations. Finding a job that is fulfilling. Finding meaningful relationships. Finding a life purpose. Things like that.

The biggest insight I got from the book is to not settle until you find your purpose, and find a career and lifestyle that supports it. I was surprised to learn that Christensen (a Harvard Business School professor) didn’t decide to teach until he was in his late 30’s, after two other careers.

It’s never too late to make a change. When it comes to your profession, you will spend a large portion of the waking hours in your prime years doing what you do. Pick something great and don’t settle until you find it.

How will you measure your life?

One of the first business books I read (not counting college textbooks) was The Innovators Dilemma by Clayton Christensen. I was an intern at Microsoft 12 years ago and my boss had just read it. He handed it to me (along with a stack of printed revenue reports to review) and recommend I take a look. The book is a classic now, easy to read and simple in its theory but very applicable then and now to the problem of sustained innovation for any business.

I’m now halfway rough his latest book How Will You Measure Your Life in which he applies business theory to the problem of finding a career and life purpose that will be fulfilling.

The Innovators Dilemma theory states that businesses that are successful are often and eventually disrupted by emergent strategies by companies in their industry, with products that are initially deemed inferior in some way, but superior in other meaningful ways. In the same way that people initially dismissed autos as inferior to horses and buggies (they were noisy, broke down and were limited to level roads), the autos slowly improved and redefined transportation. The same thing has happened to the steel business, retail stores, tech industry, books, restaurants and almost every other industry.

I like this book because it challenges the reader to think hard about the patterns they are running in their lives and the assumptions and motivations driving their decisions. Christensen himself decided to get a PhD at the age of 37 and change careers to become a professor at 39, after years as a consultant and business owner. He disrupted himself before he found himself trapped in a career and lifestyle he didn’t truly love. That takes courage no book can in itself give to a reader, but the theories he lays out do help.

One Powerful Technique for Improving Your Diet and Health

Add in the good stuff. As much of it as you can. Whenever you can. 

There it is, you can skip the rest of this post! Most diets are defined by what you CAN’T eat not what you CAN eat. Vegans are all about not eating meat or dairy or eggs. Paleo’s are about not eating grains or dairy or processed stuff. Raw foodists are all about not eating cooked stuff.

The problem with this kind of thinking is that it fundamental goes against our psychology and what motivates us over the long-term. No doubt, excluding things from your diet can work very well for a while (e.g. not eating fried food, or cutting out all dairy products) – but the mental model that is FAR MORE POWERFUL and SUSTAINABLE over the long-term is one of inclusion not exclusion.

Exclusion is what I’ve already stated: defining a new way of eating based on cutting something out of your diet (meat, dairy, sugar, alcohol, etc.).

Inclusion is focused on adding in the good stuff. Eat more salad. Eat more fresh fruits. Drink more clean water. Don’t worry so much about cutting stuff out. It will happen on its own if you focus on adding in the good stuff.

Here is an example:

Suppose you are trying to lose 10 pounds over the next two months and decide that you want to overhaul your diet. Instead of saying to yourself “I am going to eliminate all the bad food from my diet”…why don’t you say “I am going to eat a big salad at every meal, no matter what.”

Notice that the second statement DOES NOT imply that you can’t eat other stuff. You can still eat your bacon and eggs for breakfast, but you also get to eat your salad. You can have the burger with lunch, but you also get to eat your big salad. You can go out for dinner and have pasta…but you better start the meal with a monster sized healthy salad.

You see…when you add in the good stuff….you slowly – but inevitably – cut out any room for bad stuff to creep in. If you are eating a salad with every meal, how much space are you going to have for sugary/fatty desserts? How much space are you going to have for bacon and eggs! Not much! Over time, you’ll start making the salad the priority and treat everything else as secondary.

Likewise, if you are trying to eliminate coffee. Instead of trying to just go cold turkey, focus on adding in TONS of clean water every day. Keep a log with how much you drink. Make sure you are hydrating over and over. You’ll find that when you are more hydrated you will sleep better, and wake up feeling better. You might even find you need that cup of coffee in the morning anymore. You can also experiment with adding in herbal teas every morning.

So next time you want to make a change in your diet…focus on adding in the good stuff, not just cutting out the bad. It will be more likely you’ll stick with whatever you are trying to do and the long-term progress will be far greater than just relying on excluding things from your diet by sheer force of will.

 

 

 

 

How to Get Along With People

I’ve had my fair share of challenging conversations over the years. It can be tough to deliver a challenging message at work, take critical feedback, deal with an emotional family situation or stand up for what you believe – even when it means going against the views of someone else.

How do you deal with such situations and the people involved?

One option is to get angry, frustrated and label the other party as wrong and maybe even totally psycho! Put the blame on the other person, protect your own ego and make it a story of “me vs them”. This option might feel good initially, but will inevitably lead to more frustration, anger and rarely will solve the issue at hand. It is far more likely that you will enrage the other party, cause more resentment and ill will between everyone. Not to mention the sleepless nights spent tossing and turning worrying about the issue.

Another option is to assume the best and highest intentions for the other person involved. Don’t cast them off as psycho. Don’t belittle their ideas. Don’t make them evil. Don’t create a story of “me vs we” or “us vs them”. Instead, assume that they are behaving the way they are because at some level, deep down, they truly believe it and it serves some higher purpose for them. Assume that in their view of the world, they are right and doing the right thing.

You do NOT need to agree with their point of view. You only need to assume that they have a reason for it, and that their intention is good. You may need to really do some soul-searching to find that good intention – but it will be there if you look hard enough.

This applies even in extreme cases – where lives (or entire ways of life) are at risk or big sums of money are at stake. Even for people the public might condemn as murderers and felons, there is some seed of intention and higher purpose for what they have done. Even if that purpose serves only the individual and not the other person (or people/community) involved. It is still there.

For less  extreme cases – this is also true. Let’s take the example of a disagreement at work with a co-worker. You might not agree on an issue, but if you start a conversation by assuming their best intention (they are trying to help, build a stronger team, solve a hard problem, etc.) then you immediately have common ground and can move forward to find a resolution. You don’t have to agree with their actions, but how can you doubt their intentions? How do you know what is going on in their head? You don’t, so take the “high road” and assume the best.

At some level everyone is right in their own mind and any dialogue needs to start with acknowledging that in your own mind and internal dialogue. The alternative is to assume they are out to get you in some way…and that way of thinking just leads to stress and despair.

I prefer the way of thinking that lets me sleep well at night.

Organic Food is Worth the Cost

Yesterday I watched a great documentary called FRESH about the merits of organic farming and the issues with the modern industrial food complex. You can stream it on Netflix. I highly recommend that you do so before you eat your next meal.

Organic food is worth the cost. Organic produce has 40% more nutrition (on average) than conventionally grown stuff. There are studies that demonstrate how medium-sized organic farms can out-produce large-scale industrial farms over the long-term – with higher profitability for farmers and healthier customers in the process. The health and environmental issues with conventional industrial farming practices are too big to ignore. The animal welfare is another thing…..I’ll save that for another post.

Before I paid attention to what I ate (college days!), I would cringe at the notion of paying $0.50 extra per pound for organic bananas or $4+ for a dozen organic eggs. Now, it is a no-brainer. Even better, buy local AND organic.

I order my groceries through SPUD. They make it easy for people in the Seattle area to buy fresh, local, organic products – with the added convenience of home delivery and the gas savings of not having to drive to the store all the time (they deliver ~100 orders at a time via their trucks which is far more efficient).

Every dollar you spend is a vote in favor or against sustainable food production. Vote wisely!